"The dotted lines around each rider/character suggest it was some kind of pull-out poster for children (or nostalgic road-racing fans)." - Rapha
Arguably this is an infographic, but when you say that in 2014 all I think of is the stereotypical.
This poster was made before that word existed (i think), and is mainly illustrations. That’s why I like it. It’s accessible because it looks as if you could assemble it into some sort of game on your kitchen table. Plus, it communicates a truthful picture of any big cycling event (just lots of guys on bikes, and other guys shouting and chasing them around in cars).
Other stuff that could use this art direction: Rambo: First Blood, The Olympics, The Middle East, Oliver Twist

"The dotted lines around each rider/character suggest it was some kind of pull-out poster for children (or nostalgic road-racing fans)." - Rapha

Arguably this is an infographic, but when you say that in 2014 all I think of is the stereotypical.

This poster was made before that word existed (i think), and is mainly illustrations. That’s why I like it. It’s accessible because it looks as if you could assemble it into some sort of game on your kitchen table. Plus, it communicates a truthful picture of any big cycling event (just lots of guys on bikes, and other guys shouting and chasing them around in cars).

Other stuff that could use this art direction: Rambo: First Blood, The Olympics, The Middle East, Oliver Twist

So does that new technology mean I don’t have a purpose anymore?

image

I can’t see into the future, but…

I’m confident our voices will become the dominant, primary mode to interface with machines. That is, in the consumer context, to quickly access relevant, useful information. Watching my 8 year old cousin ask a tablet “is there going to be a thunderstorm tonight?” and immediately getting an answer, crushes any doubt that this technology will prove itself. 

But how does this affect me?! Will this move the centre of gravity away from designers and back into the able hands of the engineers (*booming thunder and evil laugh*)? No, not necessarily.

The definition of digital design is painfully incomplete. The way designers market themselves and their services is even more opaque. Yeah, transparency is scary, especially for creatives, and it’s much easier to throw a smoke bomb than to explain or question yourself.

But, however painful, you have to define what your mission is. The point of this exercise is to make sure your course is always correct. At worst, you can hold on and continually weather the storm, catching up with trends and methods as they fly past. At best you see over the waves and change direction. Basically just stuff like: Why are a designer? What are you are helping fix? What can you do that others can’t? Why are you a designer (or lumberjack, or pastry chef)? If you don’t know what you’re doing, how will you ever achieve x? 

But within the design industry especially, it’s very difficult to hear above the din of twitter and medium, and find true north for yourself (last nautical analogy). For me, this essay is something that I’d refer to, to help recalibrate.

"The time bar graph was invented about 250 years ago. The map and the written sentence are both about 5000 years old. They are beautiful, venerable forms of visual communication. The bugs have been worked out. They are universally, intuitively understood.

The pulldown menu, the checkbox, and the bureaucracy-inspired text entry form were invented 25 years ago, desperation devices to counter inadequate technology. They were created for a world that no longer exists.

Twenty-five years from now, no one will be clicking on drop-down menus, but everyone will still be pointing at maps and correcting each others’ sentences. It’s fundamental. Good information software reflects how humans, not computers, deal with information.” - Bret Victor

There’s a reason I search out opinions like this. I agree with them, and it confirms my bias of the importance of the ‘visual communication’ of information. (That doesn’t mean I’m correct, or he’s correct).

Voice as an interface doesn’t kill interface design, because it doesn’t kill information. But it will permanently change it. And that’s something I have to think about.

We will go beyond linear to truly non-linear experiences, from feed scrolling or input-driven to something proactive, adaptive and personalized. Search and social will remain for the time being, yet a new user experience paradigm will be born around predictive content discovery.

The graphic design of Gambling. It sounds like a book by Steven Heller, the only guy who writes books about topics like that. But it’s not, in fact hardly anything exists on the subject.

Touch interfaces that people spend not minutes, but hours, or entire days using. The concept of slot machines is unpleasant to me, and the imagery they use mirrors the casino environment; bright, garish, fake, but powerfully alluring. Simple fruit icons (that existed because the machine spat out chewing gum winnings), have now (i think) been largely replaced by a fantastical 3D world of Ancient Greeks & (ironically?) Native American Indians.

I’d like to talk to the designers and visual artists. How much has been already decided? What data do they use? Do they know what works? Does Zeus and the ancient Greeks test well? Does a gold interface retain attention longer than platinum or bronze? What about the users? Do they even think about the visuals? I’d guess that the eye candy is there as a distraction, a gel that covers their complex battle of chance with the machine. ‘It’s pretty… I don’t know, I just want to win big!’

I pulled on my old faded jeans, torn at both knees, and a gray sweatshirt, and hurried to join everyone for breakfast. Agatha cooked us oatmeal with big lumps of brown sugar and butter on top. After breakfast Brad built a big cozy fire and Terri worked on her wildflower collection on the floor in front of the fireplace. While Terri glued dried flower samples onto sheets of cardboard, I sat around and waited for the rain to stop. Stupid rain.